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UK to US food conversion chart by claremanson UK to US food conversion chart by claremanson
As stated in my latest journal post a few questions have popped up lately about what some of the ingrediants in my recipes are so decided to make a little guide

i am thinking of adding metric/imperial conversions too.
looks a little boring design wise but i am hoping to add more ingredients to the list before prettying it up, so if anyone knows of any more please share so the list can be updated
thanks

my recipes including oreo truffles, cake balls, mini apple crumbles, honey and gingernut cheesecake, pizza and bread [link]
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:iconcatstock:
CatStock Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
Oh this is so interesting and helpful! =D
I currently live in England, and many of these have confused me (as my English is so influenced by American English due to watching too much TV and through games) I'm from Norway =)
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2013  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
:giggle: talking to so many Americans i can not help but call jelly jello these days, those around me laugh every time i say it! :blush:
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:iconkiki-chii:
kiki-chii Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
thanks for making this! :+favlove: I was wondering what digestive biscuits were. I had found some digestive biscuits at our natural foods store, and well, I'll just say they were not graham crackers. :giggle:
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
i recently tried graham crackers, they were horrible! digestives are the clostest alternative we have here to them, just as well really as i much prefer digestives :giggle:
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:iconkiki-chii:
kiki-chii Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
i don't like graham crackers either, i prefer to just crush nilla wafers, takes longer to do but i like the taste better and gives a little crunch to my cheesecake. :iconbummy1:
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
never heard if nilla wafers before! i have to use any gluten free biscuits i can get holf of these days as i can't eat gluten anymore.
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:iconkiki-chii:
kiki-chii Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
they are small, round, hard, flat cookies that have a hint of vanilla flavor. idk if they are gluten free or not, they are made by kraft foods, i think.
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Nov 7, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
ah then i doubt they are, i have never seen any gluten free kraft stuff.
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:iconfeliks-grell:
Feliks-Grell Featured By Owner May 24, 2012
Very usefull, expecially to understand other recipes I could find on the internet :3 (Actually, I'm not a native english speaker, so sometimes I get better uk words, sometimes Us ones.. xD)

btw, thanks a lot :)
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner May 25, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
glad to be of help :)
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:icongemmawolf:
gemmawolf Featured By Owner May 15, 2012
There's a different word for crumpet?!
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:iconladyrandomm13:
ladyrandomm13 Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012  Student
Really helpful, thanks :)
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
glad to be of help :)
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:iconladyrandomm13:
ladyrandomm13 Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2012  Student
:D
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:iconterrawolffe:
TerraWolffe Featured By Owner Feb 11, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Thank you, this is very helpful!

I live in Texas and have never heard some of US terms used, like "celery rib". XD
Regional names are always interesting. Like the East Coaster in an earlier comment, I've always used "hard boiled egg," and "ketchup," though my grandmother does say "catsup".
We also use "skirt steak" but here in Texas are more like to call it "fajita meat".

I never knew that maize was used as a term for corn in general. Here, it's a specific variety of colorful corn--I think other terms are calico corn and Indian corn--that's pretty tough to eat. Looks pretty though, and I've seen it used for decoration.

The mars bar/milky way/ three musketeer thing is interesting. I first thought it was similar to the tendancy in the Southern US to refer to all soda as "coke" (though starting with my generation this has changed and just about anyone under 25 uses "soda") but a quick wiki search tells me that they are actually labeled as Milky Ways in the UK. Crazy!
I wonder if UK Milky Ways taste better than 3 Musketeers. I sure as hell can't eat Drumsticks anymore after having a wonderful, wonderful Cornetto. D:
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
i love finding out about all these differences, i never knew just how different countries are with words until i started baking, even in england which is relatively small there are regional differences. up north is a savoury thing called Pease Pudding i have never heard of until someone moved from there to here. in the south west we have Welsh Cakes which up north don't know about either
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:iconfelixcani:
Felixcani Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Ehm so Uk to left and US to right ?
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
yes that is correct :)
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:iconmute9:
Mute9 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Student Writer
Interesting. I'm Australian, and most of our terms are the british ones, some are the american ones, and there are things there we don't have at all! E.g. candy floss/cotton candy is called Fairy Floss over here; sprinkles are either the little sticks or the little balls, but hundreds and thousands are always the little balls...Milky Way and Mars Bar are completely different things, but what the hell is a "3 musketeers"?

:shrug: cultural differences fascinate me.
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
oh i learn something new everyday on here :) interesting names you have for things. we both have milky ways and mars bars here in the uk so i now how different the normal ones are but there is a caramel version tha looks pretty much like mars bars. also 3 musketeers are basically the origianl milky ways with no caramel or anything.

cultural differences fascinate me also, i have recently got some old cooking books from my father in law and in it is another list of conversions and weight differences from the 1980's, i will have to take a photo of them and add it on DA sometime.
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
hi there, i actually live in england but thanks anyway :)
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:iconzeta-eta:
zeta-eta Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Added to my food blog! :dance: [link]
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Nov 14, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
o thanks love it :)
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:iconnecktiepom:
NecktiePom Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2011
lol I live in Scotland and some of the UK ones confused me D8 I never knew things where said so differently in the US or even England xD; very interesting!
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
wow i didn't know things where said differently in Scotland! what things confuses you?
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:iconarcalian:
Arcalian Featured By Owner May 5, 2011
Maybe it's a regional thing (East Coast) but this American has always known hard boiled eggs and ketchup by those names. I think "catsup" went out of style here around 1930 or so.

Oh, and popsical is spelled "popsicle."

Also, I thought Brits used lemonade for *any* flavor of soda?

Sorry to nitpick, it IS a cool list.
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner May 5, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
thanks for the information, it's good to know.
wonder if it is a regional thing, we have regional names for things in england too.
as for soda, we have the "ades" lemonade, cherryade, orangade, limeade etc
thanks again
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:iconicewind136:
Icewind136 Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011  Student General Artist
This is...amazingly useful. Not for baking, exactly, because I live in America and always have, but for understanding the finer details of literature! I have heard most of these foods mentioned in books but I never connected a lot of them to foods I know. I just kind of imagined them as completely different, mostly utterly bizarre foods that America was smart enough to stay away from. For example, jacket potatoes were mystifying and digestive biscuits sound like they would taste strongly of baking soda. Thank you for clarifying this!
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
i know what you mean, i always thought eggplant was some strange american vegtable that we couldn't grow or something, i was fasinated by it until i found out they are just aubegines then it was a huge let down as they are very boring
glad to be of some use :)
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:iconcharlotte-holmes:
Charlotte-Holmes Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011
This is actually really enlightening. Sometimes when reading american books I can't work out what they are talking about and it does make reading recipes harder too. Thanks :D
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Apr 27, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
reading american recpes online and being totaly confused by some of the ingredients is what made me write this in the first place, some of the different words are just really weird and would never have been able to guess what they were without looking them up
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:icongatta-demonia:
gatta-demonia Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011
Faggot also means meatball? I thought it just meant cigarettes in the UK. :lol: But this is very helpful, thanks a bunch!
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
hehe your close "fag" or "backy" are the other words for cigarettes here

meatballs are the closest thing to faggots in the US, though meatballs are just called meatballs here. faggots are really nasty things tradionally made out of all sorts of animal parts and organs like pig hearts and liver, heres the wiki link if you really want to know all the yucky stuff that goes into it lol [link]

Also the term faggot is used as an offensive word against homosexuals here

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:icongatta-demonia:
gatta-demonia Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011
Oh, derp. :B

I honestly never knew that. Very interesting. Thanks! :lol:
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:icondefy-the-wind:
defy-the-wind Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011
From a person used to US English, now living in UK, THANK YOU! :aww:
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
i'm glad to be of help, i'm sure you are going to come across hundreds more different words the longer you are here, foods are also called different things depending on which part of the country you are in too, language can be a very confusing thing sometimes
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:icondefy-the-wind:
defy-the-wind Featured By Owner May 5, 2011
Oh, I've learned the word 'dodgy' and it applies in 90% of the conversations. :P

I still have troubles when ordering fries, I mean chips, no...not crisps... :(
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner May 6, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
haha yes, i must say i use the word dodgy a lot too
the whole fries, chips, crisps thing really used to confuse me so much as a kid when watching movies hehe
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:iconmute9:
Mute9 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Student Writer
In Australia, everything is much easier: we have chips, and hot chips. Simple. :D
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
what are hot chips?
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:iconmute9:
Mute9 Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Student Writer
What americans call fries. And crisps are packet chips.
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2012  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
oh i see, i was thinking spices hehe silly me me!
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:iconfreddofroggy:
freddofroggy Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011
This is really helpful, thank you :D
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:iconclaremanson:
claremanson Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011  Hobbyist Artisan Crafter
no problem, glad to be of help, i like your food gallery by the way, very tasty looking
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:iconfreddofroggy:
freddofroggy Featured By Owner Apr 26, 2011
Thank you! :aww:
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